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These 45 years of dedicated technology development in close working relationships with our customers have built AVEVA's worldwide reputation for the quality and dependability of the software they use. Sustaining this reputation against the relentless criminal activities of hackers and counterfeiters, however, has become almost as much of a challenge as creating the software. Despite the use of sophisticated security and integrity features in our software, cracked and illegal copies are not hard to find. And while 'free' copies of expensive software may seem superficially attractive, like illegal drugs they are frequently a doorway into the criminal underworld. These pirated products distort fair business competition and can put at risk the management and the IT administrators of companies who, even if unknowingly, own and use illegal copies.This problem is shared by all in the software industry; the Business Software Alliance (BSA), of which AVEVA is a member, conservatively estimates that 42% of the world's computers have illegal software on them. This is an astonishing - and worrying - statistic, because it highlights the extent to which each 'harmless' copy of a program actually feeds a massive global criminal industry.AVEVA takes its responsibilities to its customers very seriously, which is why we are tackling this challenge head-on with a global team of investigators who work closely with others in our industry and with international law enforcement agencies. But we are not doing this simply to protect our revenues; illegal software damages everybody's interests. Most visibly, it distorts competition by enabling unfair undercutting of prices. Less visibly, it promotes a culture in which illegal or unethical conduct becomes the norm, a corrosive situation which can lead to catastrophic consequences. Counterfeit software can be as dangerous as counterfeit pharmaceuticals.Our approachAs in many aspects of law enforcement, AVEVA's approach to the problem is based on evidence and intelligence. Intelligence enables one to gather a picture of a suspicious organisation or individual. For example, an organisation may have one or two licensed installations and yet the apparent number of users and the sizes of its projects suggest that they must have many more. Such an organisation would be labelled as potentially non-compliant. This is an obvious, and common, example of the easier aspects of an investigation. At the other end of the scale more sophisticated intelligence gathering may be required, for which there are a number of specialised tools available. AVEVA makes extensive use of sophisticated monitoring technology to target the hot spots of software piracy. The ultimate aim of intelligence is to discover evidence which will support successful legal proceedings. Evidence is gathered in a number of ways, some highly technical and sophisticated, but often as simple as information being provided by disgruntled ex-employees of the non-compliant organisation. The appropriate action taken depends on the nature of the organisation concerned and the extent of its non-compliance. AVEVA never looks for punishment where encouraging a non-compliant customer to become compliant would be effective. Often, this encouragement consists of simply explaining the many benefits of becoming a fully supported member of the worldwide AVEVA user community.However, if encouragement fails, we will not hesitate to pursue legal remedies through the criminal courts. AVEVA will use all lawful means of obtaining evidence; on occasion this has included working with local law enforcement agencies to raid companies' offices. Conviction can have serious repercussions for the non-compliant company; the punishments can be severe and in many jurisdictions we find considerable support for anti-piracy cases.Despite such concerted efforts by AVEVA and others in the industry, software piracy is an increasing problem. Worldwide, the future will see greatly increased resources and more sophisticated measures being applied against it. AVEVA in particular is increasing its efforts in protecting its intellectual property because we have a duty to our customers, from whom our revenues serve to continually create ever more powerful products that improve the operation of their business. About David GriffithsDavid was formerly a senior police detective and has over 25 years' experience specialising in electronic crime, working with law enforcement agencies around the world. He heads up AVEVA's global team of compliance investigators, maintaining his contacts in law enforcement and collaborating with them and with industry bodies in tackling software piracy crime.Keeping software healthy How AVEVA is tackling the hackers and counterfeitersAVEVA World Magazine 2012|Issue 235Stamp it out!You can play a part in the fight against software piracy. If you know of, or suspect, any instances of piracy, abuse, unlicensed use or counterfeiting of AVEVA's software, you can report it, in confidence, to piracy@aveva.com. David Griffiths Head of Global Compliance

36AVEVA World Magazine 2012|Issue 2In the hydrocarbon industry alone, Electrical & Instrumentation systems (E&I) represent 29% of the world's capital expenditure on plant. In plant operations, E&I typically accounts for 60% of maintainable items, as well as being critical to safe and efficient operation, so there is a premium on right-first-time design, ease of maintenance, and control of information. Making ConnectionsHow new AVEVA technology is transforming productivity in electrical engineering and designYet E&I engineers have, until now, been poorly served, often obliged to make do with spreadsheets and simple drafting applications. This leads to considerable inefficiency and wasted effort. Worse still, such makeshift solutions create too many opportunities for errors which, if undetected, can give rise to potentially serious hazards. Even the most popular special-purpose applications are considered difficult to use and do not make sufficient use of the information they create.In 2009, recognising this need, AVEVA released AVEVA Instrumentation, a ground-breaking application which quickly became one of the company's fastest-growing products. So successful did this prove that customers almost immediately began asking for an electrical application with the same power and ease of use. Earlier this year we delivered on our promise with AVEVA Electrical, recognisably a sister product to AVEVA Instrumentation and featuring many similar productivity features.AVEVA Electrical Wiring Manager - Working on the same project, electrical engineers can see instrumentation objects and vice versa.Kelvin DavisMarketing Communications Manager