page 1
page 2
page 3
page 4
page 5
page 6
page 7
page 8
page 9
page 10
page 11
page 12
page 13
page 14
page 15
page 16
page 17
page 18
page 19
page 20
page 21
page 22
page 23
page 24
page 25
page 26
page 27
page 28
page 29
page 30
page 31
page 32
page 33
page 34
page 35
page 36
page 37
page 38
page 39
page 40
page 41
page 42
page 43
page 44
page 45
page 46
page 47
page 48
page 49
page 50
page 51
page 52
page 53
page 54
page 55
page 56
page 57
page 58
page 59
page 60
page 61
page 62
page 63
page 64
page 65
page 66
page 67
page 68
page 69
page 70
page 71
page 72
page 73
page 74
page 75
page 76
page 77
page 78
page 79
page 80
page 81
page 82
page 83
page 84
page 85
page 86
page 87
page 88
page 89
page 90
page 91
page 92
page 93
page 94
page 95
page 96
page 97
page 98
page 99
page 100
page 101
page 102
page 103
page 104
page 105
page 106
page 107
page 108
page 109
page 110
page 111
page 112
page 113
page 114
page 115
page 116
page 117
page 118
page 119
page 120
page 121
page 122
page 123
page 124
page 125
page 126
page 127
page 128
page 129
page 130
page 131
page 132
page 133
page 134
page 135
page 136
page 137
page 138
page 139
page 140
page 141
page 142
page 143
page 144
page 145
page 146
page 147
page 148
page 149
page 150
page 151
page 152
page 153
page 154
page 155
page 156
page 157
page 158

n what represents a major achievement inthe fight against global warming andclimate change, the first ever mandatoryglobal greenhouse gas (GHG) reductionregime for an international industry sector has beenadopted, this year, by the International MaritimeOrganization. Mandatory measures to reduce emissions of GHGsfrom international shipping were adopted by Parties toAnnex VI of the MARPOL Convention, during the 62ndsession of IMO's Marine Environment ProtectionCommittee (MEPC) in July 2011. The MARPOL Convention is the primary internationalinstrument regulating international shipping from anenvironmental perspective. These new regulationsapply to all ships of 400 gross tonnage and above andare expected to enter into force on 1 January 2013.Itis estimated that they could help ship operators saveIMOACHIEVESGHG EMISSIONS BREAKTHROUGH096LOGISTICSEFTHIMIOS E. MITROPOULOS, SECRETARY-GENERAL, THE INTERNATIONALMARITIME ORGANIZATION (IMO)IPhoto: Copyright IMO

LOGISTICS097Photo: IMO has beendeveloping technical andoperational measures toreduce greenhouse gasemissions from shipsbetween US$34 to US$68 billion in fuel costs, as wellas reduce CO2 emissions from international maritimetransport by up to 200 million tonnes, by 2020.Shipping is already the most energy efficient way totransport goods and raw materials around the worldand, as such, is only a modest contributor to global(GHG) emissions. In the 2009 IMO Study on GHGEmissions from Ships, international shipping wasestimated to have emitted 870 million tonnes, orabout 2.7 per cent of the global emissions of CO2 in2007, despite being responsible for carrying morethan 90 per cent of world trade by tonne-mile. Nevertheless, through IMO, Governments have beenengaged for some considerable time in a processaimed at reducing still further the release of harmfulatmospheric emissions from ships. Due to the globalcharacter of shipping, an effective control regimerequires global regulation that applies universally to allships and thereby maintains a level playing-field for allships, irrespective of the country in which the ship isregistered (flag State) or the nationality of the vessel'sownership. This has now been achieved, through theamendments to MARPOL Annex VI.The amendments to MARPOL Annex VI add a newChapter 4 to the Annex, entitled Regulations on energyefficiency for ships to make mandatory the EnergyEfficiency Design Index (EEDI), for new ships, and theShip Energy Efficiency Management Plan (SEEMP) forall ships. Other amendments to Annex VI add newdefinitions and the requirements for survey andcertification, including the format for the InternationalEnergy Efficiency Certificate.TECHNICAL AND OPERATIONALMEASURESThe EEDI is a technical measure, which requires allnew ships above 400 gross tonnage to meet aminimum energy efficiency level per capacity mile (i.e.