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technology30 www.exhibitionnews.co.ukCloserStill Media is also looking into how to best employ QR codes. Event director for Learning and Skills Jonquil Coy said it will supply exhibitors with individual QR codes at the upcoming Learning Technologies and inaugural Learning and Skills exhibition in January 2012. Exhibitors can use these in pre-show marketing collateral, their brochures or as part of displays to direct visitors to their website, specific promotional offers or a dedicated web page."For exhibitors, it's a handy way to give customers access to information," Coy said. "It's all part of the ongoing push to digitise hardcopy collateral and products."To complement exhibitors displaying QR codes, CloserStill is developing a mobile app that will help visitors download the required QR code scanner app. The exhibition team is also using QR codes on their business cards that link directly back to an aggregated site including the show's Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn Group and website. Coy pointed to environmental positives from using QR codes such as cutting print collateral on the stand. "Inevitably you come away from a show with a stack of brochures and there's so much you don't want. There's an elegance in being able to scan an exhibitor's info and return to it digitally post-event," she claimed. "Organisers and exhibitors need to think of QR codes as retail tools - for example, an exhibitor could be giving 20 per cent off training booked in February and use the QR code to help visitors utilise this offer."It's difficult to see a disadvantage in using them. QR codes will form part of the value-add we have in the exhibitor package. This is particularly the case with tech shows, where we need to be seen embracing these new tools."Rival appRoachesQR codes aren't the only type of next-generation barcode available today. MD of US-based events and media agency Finn Digital has developed a new product, BoothTag, to drive trade show visitors to exhibitor booths. BoothTag uses Microsoft Tag, a rival but similar offering to QR codes that also offers device ID detection and location-aware capabilities, Finn Digital MD Bill Finn said. BoothTag was recently used at the CompTIA IT industry exhibition to facilitate a scavenger hunt. The principle was to drive attendees to various exhibitor booths to scan barcodes in return for incentives and prizes. Finn said the initiative generated 11,200 scans over three days across 163 stands. "CompTIA wanted to make the trade show more engaging, so we came up with the concept of using BoothTag as a game on the show floor," Finn explained. "The old school way of running a trade show is to have exhibitors on either side of the aisle, but they may not see anyone they're interested in or find visitors avoiding eye contact so they don't get 'sold to'. "We turned that on its head by providing incentives for attendees to go to exhibitor booths, scan the code on the stand and obtain points to redeem prizes." Exhibitors and visitors were given unique codes so both sides could retrieve a customised list of who they met during the show. Having location awareness also allowed the organiser to see hot spots of activity or popular exhibitors, Finn said. exhibitoR usageLocally, UK suppliers see next-generation barcodes as another way for exhibitors to improve their show profile's visibility. Website contractor ASP Events MD Arran Coole said the company can automatically generate QR codes for exhibitors to use for marketing. These are accessible when they update their listing in a show's exhibitor zone. "Exhibitors can download the QR code from the expo website, display it on their adverts and on the stand itself and use it to link back to their profile on the expo website, thus keeping the show in the mix too," Coole said. AV contractor Aztec employed QR codes this year to improve its own exhibitor profile at The Event and Exhibiting Show. The company used QR codes to invite visitors to the event, then to receive information about products at the show. These codes were displayed on pre-show email invitations, on the stand and on T-shirts worn by the company's staff on the stand. "It was a simple, gimmicky and yet also a practical way of engagement," MD John Robson said. "Once scanned, visitors were sent an email with the link to our product information on the website, which they could view on their PC."Having dipped a toe in the water, Aztec is looking to now use QR codes at the Event Production Show next February and is investing in detailed tracking to see what information visitors respond to.visitoR viewsWhile marketing interest is clearly there, the success of QR codes depends on exhibitors and visitor familiarity. Director of exhibitor services for US-based 21st Century Building Expo and Conference Tracie Garrett said the organiser offered free logos for every exhibitor listing using a QR code at one of its recent exhibitions. Not one exhibitor took advantage of it. "We even offered a discount to our show with the QR code on the brochure sent to potential attendees. Still no takers," she claimed. "Even though we now see them everywhere, the general public doesn't know what QR codes are because they've never really seen a good explanation of what they are and how they are used."Despite her initial experiences, Garrett still believed QR codes to be a good way to get a big message across with "a small symbol". "Getting started is the hardest part, particularly if visitors have not used a barcode reader before," BoothTag's Finn continued. He claimed the first and biggest step is ensuring a visitor downloads the free scanner app. "We produce packs in advance of the events including quickstart cards where we outline the four steps to getting on-board," Finn said. "We've seen most interest where there is a technology flavour to the event, but it's starting to broaden out. All the reports indicate that barcode scanning use is widening exponentially." Regardless of whether it's QR, Microsoft Tag or next-generation technologies like Near Field Communication (see breakout box below), Finn claimed mobile connectivity is transforming the show floor. Exhibition organisers and exhibitors ignore smartphones at their peril. "All of this is changing the way people think about the traditional trade show and giving us a new perspective on visitor and exhibitor interaction," Finn added. QR (Quick Response) codes, sometimes referred to as Mobile codes or 2D barcodes, are the next generation of barcodes. here, we outline five facts about this new technology.1. Free and universal: QR codes are free to generate and distribute; just google 'QR code generator'. they can also be read anywhere in the world with the same result. 2. Designed for smartphones: you will need a special QR code reader app installed on your phone to interpret the codes. these include QR Reader for iPhone, QR Droid for Android, Blackberry App World App and Windows Phone 7 Bing. 3. Can store up 7000 characters: check out www.beqrious.com/generator to give you a good example of what you can store in a QR code. once printed, you cannot change the result. So keep it simple and test before you print.4. You need clarity: QR codes suffer from camera flash reflection, out-of-focus, distance restrictions, low-light conditions and low-quality printed codes. If you're providing these to an exhibitor, print clear/sharp codes and display these in good light in an unobstructed location to get a clear photo. 5. They are a precursor for NFC: Master QR codes now and get ready for the near Field communication (nFc) tag, the next generation electronic QR code. nFc is being branded as the next step beyond QR codes for its ability to provide similar interaction capabilities but without the need for barcodes. Much like Bluetooth, nFc allows a two-way exchange between two devices enabled for the technology and was developed to aid wireless transactions, exchange digital contact details and connect devices. nFc will allow users to simply wave their phones near the tag to download information. the rise of google Android phone take-up and Apple's upcoming iPhone 5 will ensure nFc tags go mainstream.- Luke Glen is the MD of SpotID.QR: 5 things you should knowAll of this is changing the way people think about the trade show and gives us a new perspective on visitor and exhibitor interaction

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