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countries manage their response to achieving bothfood and water security:INFORMATION Greatly expand location-specific weather, soil andwater-related information on a timely, reliable andsustained basis; promote its rapid and widedissemination to vulnerable populations usingmodern technology; Redouble national efforts to address the risk to smallfarm agriculture, and to better prepare for climateresilience by improving the knowledge andinformation base on natural resources, especially soiland water;For disaster risk management, improve theunderstanding of the variability and reliability of water resources (e.g., by enhancing waterresources assessment);Monitor water resources availability in time andspace (e.g., by enhancing hydro-meteorologicalcapacity and networks);Monitor water use and the efficiency andeffectiveness of such use.INVESTMENTPromote investments to support climate-resilientagriculture; Place long-term strategies for the sustainable andequitable use of water at the heart of climateadaptation investment;Invest in preparedness for water related disasters -current and future, e.g., from the ineffective, costlyand inefficient surface irrigation systems and fromthe "tragedy of the commons" that causes rapiddepletion of aquifers; 114SUSTAINABLE WATERReduce complexity and increase flexibility indeveloping countries' access to adaptation fundsamong the myriad of climate-related funds bycreating standard, easy-to-follow requirements forborrowing countries.INFRASTRUCTUREEvaluate the appropriateness and need for large,small and natural water storage infrastructure, bothabove and below ground, in order to ensure access towater for multiple uses in an efficient, equitable andsustainable way.INSTITUTIONSDevelop regulatory frameworks that support theimplementation of both climate mitigation andclimate adaptation strategies and actions;Develop institutions that can manage inter-sectoraldisagreements;Promote regional integration, including trade in food,energy and water that will increase regional security(e.g., through hydroelectric power and its tradeacross borders);Improve policies for pricing of electricity, water, andfood procurement and distribution to protectvulnerable groups, while providing incentives toincrease agricultural production and productivityamong small farmers.Water is the medium that links food security, energysecurity, climate change, economic growth and humanlivelihoods. Making water security a top developmentpriority is one sure way to reduce countries' social,economic, political and environmental vulnerability. nThis article was prepared with the help of members ofthe Technical Committee of the Global WaterPartnership, an international network of 13 Regionaland 79 Country Water Partnerships, and more than2,300 institutional partners in 157 countries. TheGWP network is committed to the sustainabledevelopment and management of water resources atall levels.Global Water Partnership (GWP)Drottninggatan 33 SE-111 51 Stockholm, SWEDENTel: +46 (0) 8 522 126, www.gwp.orgABOUT THE AUTHORDr Ania Grobicki is the Executive Secretary of theGlobal Water Partnership. Dr Grobicki has spent mostof her working life on water-related issues, holdingpositions in the private sector as well as with NGOsand the United Nations. She has a PhD inBiotechnology from Imperial College, London.

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