page 1
page 2
page 3
page 4
page 5
page 6
page 7
page 8
page 9
page 10
page 11
page 12
page 13
page 14
page 15
page 16
page 17
page 18
page 19
page 20
page 21
page 22
page 23
page 24
page 25
page 26
page 27
page 28
page 29
page 30
page 31
page 32
page 33
page 34
page 35
page 36
page 37
page 38
page 39
page 40
page 41
page 42
page 43
page 44
page 45
page 46
page 47
page 48
page 49
page 50
page 51
page 52
page 53
page 54
page 55
page 56
page 57
page 58
page 59
page 60
page 61
page 62
page 63
page 64
page 65
page 66
page 67
page 68
page 69
page 70
page 71
page 72
page 73
page 74
page 75
page 76
page 77
page 78
page 79
page 80
page 81
page 82
page 83
page 84
page 85
page 86
page 87
page 88
page 89
page 90
page 91
page 92
page 93
page 94
page 95
page 96
page 97
page 98
page 99
page 100
page 101
page 102
page 103
page 104
page 105
page 106
page 107
page 108
page 109
page 110
page 111
page 112
page 113
page 114
page 115
page 116
page 117
page 118
page 119
page 120
page 121
page 122
page 123
page 124
page 125
page 126
page 127
page 128
page 129
page 130
page 131
page 132

quickly and incorporated into the UNFCCC process. Itwill also be increasingly important this year to supportcountries to manage expectations for REDD+ that havegrown since Cancun. Countries will still need toaddress some unresolved issues such as how referenceemissions levels should be set, the definition of forestsand degradation, and the relationship between REDD+and nationally-appropriate mitigation actions. REDD+needs to be embedded into low-carbon developmentstrategies of developing countries and be part of acomprehensive climate change regime that has all theelements to effectively mitigate climate change andkeep temperature rise below two degrees. Finally, as044POST-CANCUN REMARKSAbove: Tropical forestsand mountains inKalimantan, Indonesia the REDD+ mechanism is fully defined, continuing tosecuring adequate and predictable funding for REDD+will be critical to keep learning and implementationmoving forward. CONCLUSION The challenges ahead may be great but so are theopportunities. In the lead up to COP17 in Durban,fighting climate change will require that the legitimateneeds for sustained social and economic developmentin developing countries are recognised. As livelihoodsPhotos: Christoforus Terry

Dr Katerere was the Deputy Director General ofCIFOR, based in Indonesia, and CEO of Zimbabwe'sForestry Commission. Dr Katerere holds a PhD inForest Resources from the University of Idaho andhas published extensively. In recognition of hiscontribution to forestry and development, he wasawarded the Commonwealth Queen's Award in 1993. 1http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2010/cop16/eng/07a01.pdf#page=2 2IdemPOST-CANCUN REMARKS045improve and poverty is eradicated, the capacity ofdeveloping countries to mitigate and adapt to climatechange is likely to increase. By providing an incentivefor developing countries to further invest in low-carbondevelopment and a healthier, greener tomorrow,REDD+ remains a critical component of the climatechange mitigation solution. nABOUT THE AUTHOR Dr Yemi Katerere is the Head of the UN-REDDProgramme Secretariat based in Geneva. Previously,