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092 smart cities

30 billion with green products, solutions and services, while cutting customers' CO2 emissions by roughly 317 million tons. To better serve the booming urban and infrastructure markets, Siemens has bundled all its city-related activities in areas such as transportation systems, building technologies and smart grids in a new dedicated company unit, the Siemens Infrastructure & Cities Sector.Within cities, buildings are one of the largest sources of emissions, accounting for about 21 per cent of the world's total CO2 footprint and some 40 per cent of global energy consumption. Intelligent technologies that are already available today can greatly increase buildings' energy efficiency - as Siemens is demonstrating at its own locations. The company's new world headquarters in Munich, which will open their doors at the beginning of 2016, will be one of the most advanced and energy-efficient buildings in the world. Occupying an area of 45,000 square metres, the structure will be a virtually self-sufficient, zero-energy complex. V-shaped facades, special reflectors and interconnected interior courtyards will maximise the supply of daylight to the building's offices. Groundwater and rainwater will be used to cool the structure and help meet its water requirements. If additional energy is needed, only green electricity will be used. The aim is to retain LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) platinum certification.Taipei 101, Taiwan's tallest building, was honored with the award last year. With the help of Siemens' energy efficiency experts, the skyscraper, which had already achieved a high level of environmental compatibility, was awarded platinum certification - the highest LEED rating. Annual energy costs at Taipei 101 have been reduced by US$700,000 - further proof that existing buildings also harbour significant potential savings.If energy-saving building renovation is not to be restricted to prosperous cities, cooperation with private-sector investors is a must. And it is here that Siemens is helping out with an energy-saving performance contracting model that enables customers to finance required renovations through guaranteed reductions in energy and operating costs. No upfront payments are required. To date, Siemens has optimised more than 4,500 buildings worldwide and reduced energy costs by ?1 billion and CO2 emissions by 9.7 million tons. But our climate is not only being burdened by energy consumption in inefficient buildings. Increasing urban traffic volumes are also making ? smart cities 093