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78IOC Marketing Report – Beijing 2008 Chapter FourSponsorship Omega has been providing essential timekeeping and data- handling services to the Olympic Games since 1932 and it continued its strong Olympic traditions for Beijing 2008, where it was the official timekeeper for the 23rd time. Among the many improvements in the world of sports timekeeping that were on show in Beijing were high- speed cameras that recorded more than 2,000 images per second, while new timing, scoring and false- start systems were also in place. In total, Omega handled the official timekeeping and data handling for 28 different sports at 37 competition venues. Its presence at the Games was certainly impressive, with a team of 450 on- site professionals from 19 different countries, over 420 tonnes of equipment, including 70 public scoreboards as well as 322 sport- specific scoreboards, 175km of cables and optical fibre, 65 TV generators and state- of- the- art timekeeping and data- handling technology. As well as delivering competition details and results to judges, coaches and the public, Omega's Olympic sport expertise enabled it to develop and adapt its technology to the specialised timing and measuring requirements of each sport and discipline on the Olympic programme, underlining its importance to the successful staging of the Games. " Our partnership with Omega began in 1932 with the Olympic Games in Los Angeles, and the IOC has since come to rely on the unquestionable competence, enduring commitment and assured performance of its official timekeeper." Jacques Rogge, President, International Olympic Committee