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CHAIRMAN'S COMPETITIONThe 2009 NADFAS Chairman's Competition forYoung Arts was titled Buildings in Perspectiveand for it Young Arts Groups members wereasked to draw a building or part of a building, new,old or invented. The drawing had to show that theyhad understood the knack of achieving perspective. There were 77 entries from six YA Groups. Thejudges were Gri Harrison, NADFAS NationalChairman, Ben Johnson, who was commissionedto publicly paint the Cityscape during Liverpool'sEuropean Capital of Culture year, 2008, and SadieJames, a freelance artist who does a lot of workwith schools and local Societies in Surrey.Gri Harrison commented: "The judges wereimpressed by the standard of entries, andcongratulate all those who took part for theenthusiastic way they tackled the difficult andcomplex subject of perspective. Judging the entrieswas not an easy task but after much deliberationwe were unanimous in our final decisions." 38NADFAS REVIEW / SPRING 2010www.nadfas.org.ukBetween the linesThe 2009 Chairman's Competition for Young Arts was all about perspective, though the subject mattercould be as fantastical as the entrant liked. Nearly 80 YA members tackled this challenging taskCATEGORIESMEMBER'S NAMEYOUNG ARTS GROUPGroup 1 (8-11 yrs)WinnerTamzin Scot AyrshireRunner UpRobbie WintonPerthHighly Commended Emma HolbornFavershamGregor ForrestAyrshireCatrina MitchellAyrshireJames DuncanAyrshireJoni GrayAyrshireGroup 2 (12-14 yrs)Joint WinnersJosh BrownAyrshireAngus NorthStirlingHighly CommendedKirsty WrightAngusSpecial MentionJoanne HawkinsFavershamGroup 3 (15+ yrs)WinnerChelsea FrewPerthHighly CommendedKersty Millar AyrshireClockwisefrom top left:Winningentries from:Kersty Millar;Tamzin Scot; JoanneHawkins; JoshBrown; EmmaHolborn;Angus North; Chelsea Frew;Kirsty Wright

www.nadfas.org.ukNADFAS REVIEW / SPRING 2010 39ART HISTORY ABROADSchool teachers tell me thatmarking their students' writtenwork can be disheartening, butto me it is a tasty distraction from thewildly ringing telephones and generalorganisation required prior to coursedeparture. Every year, a panel of threejudges is assembled from the Art HistoryAbroad (AHA) team and NADFAS tojudge the Sir Trenchard Cox scholarship.In 2009 it was my turn once again, and Iset about the scripts with relish.We ask candidates to write a shortessay on an artwork or building thatthey love, and another on that whichthey loathe. As you can imagine, thisleads to some lively pieces as the authorstruggles to express their passion for artwhile simultaneously trying to bearticulately ghastly about it. The winningcandidate receives the full fees (worth£2,500), which can be put towards anyone of AHA's courses in Italy.Loved works in 2009 included theParthenon Sculptures, The NationalTheatre and David's Death of Marat.Loathed artists included Dali, da Vinciand Hirst (twice). Covent Garden tubestation also got it in the neck. I also sawthe most original and somewhat startlingpairing yet: in his 'Essay of Enjoyment',a boy declared that Tracy Emin's MyBedwas worthy because "the youngbinge drink, have one night stands andare often unpleasant, and I should know.", while his 'Essay of Loathing'attacked the bendy bus. The candidatewas unsuccessful as it was felt that hehad spent too much of his essay longingfor the return of the Routemaster, ratherthan despising the bendy bus. The winner of the 2009 scholarshipwrote a powerful appreciation essay onthe 5th-century BC Wounded Niobidsculpture and a devilish assault on MarkRothko's The Sacrifice of Iphrigenia. Herfinal sentence, exasperation at thecomplex meaning of modern art thatwas "accessible to only the privilegedA fine balanceArt History Abroad's Dan Evansexplains that when judging the Sir Trenchard Cox scholarship it is theentries that demonstrate both reason and passion that catch his eyefew who had the chance to study them"captured the attention (if not theagreement) of all the judges.When reading the entries, I try to leavemy personal opinions to one side. I findmyself smiling wryly when I agree withthe candidate, but I do remember myeyes widening in horror a few yearsback when a boy described theLaocoon sculpture group: "as charmlessas the priest is helpless". In all honesty,disagreeing with my sentimentalitiesusually works in the candidates' favour,because while a differing opinion makesthe heart quickenand the mind whir, itreminds me to remain unbiased. Ifrequently use that Laocoon line whenteaching in the Vatican.Some write proseessays, others takethe academic line, and this usuallysparks the judges' first debate. Can andshould those that write beautifully bejudged on an equal footing with thosewho collate information, and put forwarda clinical argument? We generally agreethat a mixture of the two makes for amore interesting and qualified script. Apassionate plea must have substanceand conversely, a clinical argument isunreadable without fervour. It is exactly how we go aboutrecruiting our tutors. Somebody has todisplay to us that they radiate a passionfor Italy, life and learning. We look forthose that have the patience (andaptitude) to explain Aristotelian theologyin only a few sentences, and we wantour ambassadorial tutors to be involvedwith every part of the students'experience of Italy, not because theywant to fuss, but because they want topass on their own passion. Our tutorsare the secret to our courses' success.A word to future entrants -strike thisbalance and you will succeed in my eyes,and if the essay doesn't get you a prize,your outlook may well get you a job. . Details of 2010's winner can befound on page 8AHA offer two-week and five-weekcourses in the summer holidays, aswell as six-week courses for thosetaking a gap year. There is a series ofcourses directed at parents as well. The deadline for the Sir Trenchard Coxscholarship for 2011 courses isJanuary 7, 2011. Application forms canbe downloaded from the NADFAS andAHA websites. All applicants shouldcontact the Volunteering Dept atNADFAS volunteering@nadfas.org.ukand notify AHA. Call 01379 871800 orsee www.arthistoryabroad.com Above:DanEvans teachingin Giusti