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encourage participation in sport by young people.Once a young person is engaged, education has to belinked with a sporting career in which social, medical,ethical and psychological care is guaranteed. Anotherimportant way to encourage ongoing participation isby making use of Olympic champions as role models.Their example, displaying good standards of ethicalconduct, dedication to athletic achievement,orientation and responsibility towards planning a postathletic career is of great use. Future research shouldbe used in the development of sporting structures and programmes, which will allow the Olympic andsports movements to look to the future and create a sporting environment that meets the needs of theyoung people of the world.This analysis doesn't pretend to give a globalpicture but to provide a specific analysis based on the authors' academic background and experience.The guiding theme in all the full papers written by the Selection Committee members is to explain thehistorically grown concept of Olympism and theanalysis of strategies to make this concept applicablein modern contexts. Responsibility towards theconcept of Olympism and in applying it in varioussituations is analysed as a major challenge in thefuture. Even in Coubertin's day, Olympism wasdeveloped against the background of prevailingtendencies in society at the time. Coubertin is oftendescribed as a seismograph who observed processesof transformation in society to tailor his concept ofOlympism. The IOC has to do the same and has to linkthe concept of Olympism with the present day. ?THE IOC OLYMPIC STUDIESCENTRE SELECTIONCOMMITTEEThe Selection Committee of the IOC OlympicStudies Centre (OSC) has a threefold mission: toassess from an academic point of view theapplications to the Postgraduate Research GrantProgramme; to select the grant holders; and tocontribute to the enrichment of the Olympic-related academic works thanks to the articleswritten annually by its academic members. Thepresent Olympic Research Corner issue is a briefsummary of some of the key ideas written by the Selection Committee's academic members in 2009 on the common topic "Challenges andOpportunities for the Olympic Movement in future Decades". The full papers can be found on the IOCwebsite, www.olympic.org/universities. The scholars are members of the OSC GrantProgramme Selection Committee and are the following:Stephan Wassong(German Sport UniversityCologne, Germany) Kristine Toohey(GriffithUniversity Gold Coast, Australia) Gudrun Doll-Tepper(Freie Universität Berlin, Germany) BeatrizGarcía(University of Liverpool, Great Britain) BruceKidd(University of Toronto, Canada) Françoise Papa(Université Stendhal Grenoble 3, France)Alberto Reppold(Universidade Federale do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil)OLYMPIC REVIEW67OLYMPIC RESEARCH CORNERNOTES ON AUTHORS

68OLYMPIC REVIEWLONDON 2012Pendleton istargeting a hat-trick of goldmedals at theLondon GamesLONDON CALLINGOLYMPIC REVIEW BEGINS ITS COUNTDOWN TO THE 2012 GAMESWITH THE FIRST THREE INTERVIEWS WITH STARS OF EACHOF THE 26 SPORTS ON THE PROGRAMME, WHO WILL BE AIMING TO STRIKE GOLD IN TWO YEARS TIME IN LONDON