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OLYMPIC REVIEW81OLYMPIC CITIES: CITYAGENDAS, PLANNING, AND THE WORLD'S GAMES,1896-2016Edited by John R. Gold, published byRoutledge, 2010. ISBN 9780415486583,444 pages, in EnglishIn this second edition, the authors set out to provide anoverview of the shifting relationships between the OlympicGames and host cities. The three sections of the book offera remarkably wide-ranging analysis of the subject. The firstpart deals, from an historical point of view, with the urbanlegacy of the Summer and Winter Games. The secondsection looks at the planning and management of theseevents in terms of funding, promotion of host cities,security, urban development and tourism. Finally, the third part presents chronological portraits often host cities, from Berlin 1936 to Rio de Janeiro 2016.The authors contend that a city has absolutely nothing tolose by applying to host the Olympic Games, as this usuallyoffers an opportunity to revitalise the city. There are verymany examples of this. This book, aimed primarily atscholars but also accessible to the general reader,summarises perfectly the effect of the Olympic Games onurban development.Right Sydney is one of ten Olympic hosts profiled by the authors in Olympic Cities: City Agendas, Planning,and the World's Games

EUGENIOMONTIAt the 1964 Innsbruck Games, in the two-man bob, Italy's Eugenio Monti removed abolt from his sled and sent it to the Britishwho had broken theirs. They won gold, whileMonti finished third. Then in the four-manevent, Monti sent his mechanics to helprepair the Canadian sled, which was broken.Theytook gold and Monti again only bronze.THEOLYMPICSPIRIT