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OLYMPIC REVIEW25MANUFACTURINGHOPEAT THEOLYMPICMUSEUMTHEWORLDOFCALENDARGYMNAESTRADAFrom 10 to 16 July 2011, Lausanne hosted the world's largest gymnastics display. Nearly20,000 participants of all ages from around theworld, belonging to some 55 national federations,came together to celebrate their shared passionfor gymnastics. As part of the 14th World Gymnaestrada, theOlympic Museum, in collaboration with theInternational Gymnastics Federation (FIG), stagedan exhibition from 4 July to 28 August lookingback at the event since its debut in 1953. Archivephotographs, film footage and explanatory textstraced the history of the World Gymnaestrada.Above The exhibition featured archivephotographs from previous GymnaestradaAs part of the current temporary exhibition, entitledHope: When sport can change the world, theOlympic Museum is offering visitors a uniquelearning experience - the Hope Factory. Thisinteractive workshop enables them to test theirown ability to promote hope by reacting to situationsborrowed from the world of sport. Does the presenceof a referee restrict or increase freedom? Are fairplay and the spirit of competition mutually exclusive?Without being moralistic or supplying ready-made answers, the Hope Factorytakes a freshlook at Olympic values. Visitors can play a series ofinteractive machines divided into five themes:interpreting the world; celebrating diversity;understanding the rules; experiencing the spirit ofcompetition; and living by Olympic Ideals. The exhibition, aimed at children and youngpeople, was developed in cooperation with theNetherlands-based peace foundation, StichtingVredeseducatie, which has been active in the fieldof education for peace for more than 20 years.Although intended for children, the exhibition isalso proving to be a stimulating and enlighteningexperience for the wider public.After it closes at the Olympic Museum, theHope Factorywill transfer to Innsbruck to coincidewith the 2012 Youth Olympics in January.The Hope Factorycontinues at the OlympicMuseum until 6 November 2011.Below Visitors to The Olympic Museum enjoythe Hope Factoryexhibition