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Throughout history, revolutions - whether technical, social or economic - have required strong leadership. Looking to the future, the need for an energy and resource revolution could not be greater. By 2050, our planet will share 9 billion people. By 2035 global electricity demand could double. Simultaneously, we must reduce our greenhouse gas emissions by 80 per cent by mid-century. To achieve this, emissions must peak by 2020. Dealing with these challenges will require a level of systemic change that can only be described as a Clean Revolution: a transformative process that will drastically change the way we produce and consume natural resources, inspire a rapid transition to clean energy and smart technologies and embed sustainability principles at the heart of the way we conduct business and formulate policy. As in the past, this Clean Revolution must be driven by strong, innovative leadership.Examples of leadership inspiring transformative change are etched throughout history. Visionaries of the Industrial Revolution, for example, enabled catalytic changes in agriculture, transportation and industry. James Watt's radical improvements to the power, efficiency and cost-effectiveness of steam engines revolutionised industrial and commercial transportation systems, initiating the railway age. Thomas Edison's successful development of the first practical electric light bulb provided the technological breakthrough that led to rapid global electrification and the beginning of the electric revolution. Pioneers in telecommunications from Alexander Graham Bell, to Marconi, John Logie Baird and the host of innovators that gave birth to the Internet have made this planet more connected than ever before in its history. However, revolutionary technologies have always faced skepticism. In the 1780s, investors withheld ? Pictured Above: Mark KenberinNOVATION TECHNOLOGY 107

Pictured above: Child on Dad's backRight: Road lights - China" Political leadership in China has driven the country from non-player to world-leader in creating economic value from clean technologies "their payments to James Watt, convinced his technology would not be successful. By 1906, the nascent aviation community in Europe managed to turn the press against the Wright brothers, calling them "bluffers". Even Edison could not convince the scientific establishment that he had successfully developed an electric source of light. A professor who lived nearby refused invitation to a demonstration in 1879, writing instead that Edison's experiments were "a conspicuous failure" and a "fraud upon the public." In order to catalyse real systemic change, these innovators - in essence the heralds of a new age - had to exhibit resolute, steadfast commitment - but not only that: Pioneering new systems involves winning over communal peers, publicising successful developments, highlighting the benefits and explaining their vision for the future. When innovators successfully bring on board the leaders of a community, it provokes a tipping point; a moment when a new idea or technology moves from the margins and becomes mainstream. This happens when other influential leaders within a community get behind the idea. Where those people lead, the rest will follow. Change becomes unstoppable. So, change cannot simply be the outcome of an isolated technological innovation. Transformational change is driven through a diverse, interdependent community of leaders and decision makers. New technologies are often borne through scientists and engineers working in large scientific communities. For these technologies to flourish, political leaders must create institutions and policy frameworks which foster the best and brightest ideas and support their development. In addition, entrepreneurs must pioneer new business models, taking advantage of political support for the best technologies, and bringing new systems and products to the masses. The light bulb might have remained a scientific curiosity if Edison had not driven the commercialisation of the product by creating the Edison Electric Light Company, the first electrical power distribution company. A diverse set of mutually reinforcing leaders, whether disruptive innovators, political decision makers or business leaders, characterise the body of influence needed to inspire revolutionary change.We are now on the cusp of a new tipping point, where a Clean Revolution can drive us towards a low-carbon economy based on clean technologies and efficient resource use. Pioneers of the Clean Revolution are already driving transformative change. Business and government leaders are increasingly putting in place the necessary initiatives and policy frameworks that will reduce emissions whilst creating jobs, making profits and supporting economic growth through clean energy and smart technologies. These leaders of low-carbon transformation are inspiring and supporting systemic improvements across the globe. The benefits of these improvements are clear to see. Solar, wind and other emerging innovations in energy generation have catalysed extraordinary growth in clean energy markets. This has prompted a proliferation of clean energy enterprises who are capitalising on the long-term financial opportunities accrued from renewable energy production. Energy efficient lighting could reduce energy consumption in the lighting sector by 40 per cent worldwide, saving 670 million tons of CO2 emissions a year and an estimated 130 billion euros in running costs. Companies like Philips, global lighting manufacturer and partner of The Climate Group, are emulating earlier industrial innovators, seizing upon the opportunity to create economic opportunity out of low-carbon transformations. Growing markets in energy efficiency and clean energy have been boosted by supportive policy. Low-carbon incentives have enabled sub-national states like South Australia to increase wind power capacity from less than 1 per cent to 26 per cent in the last five years, driving wholesale electricity prices to their lowest level for more than a decade and emissions down 15 per cent, while inducing the state's strongest ever employment and economic growth. Political leadership in China has driven the country from non-player to world-leader in creating economic value from clean technologies. Chinese investments of US$912 billion in clean energy and environmental protection will create 10.6 million jobs, boost GDP by $1.3 trillion and drive an additional $220 billion in energy savings. We have the technology. We have pockets of outstanding business and governmental leadership. Together with other drivers, such as resource scarcity and consumer demand, the transition to a low-carbon economy is looking increasingly inevitable. But timing and scale remain key issues. The science dictates that this transition must occur at a vastly quicker rate than business as usual. Unlike the organic waves of revolutionary transformations in the past, it is clear that the Clean Revolution's transition needs to be quicker, ambitions greater, and actions stronger. The scale of transformational change requires something bigger, beyond a few standout leaders. Leadership must shift from the margins and into the mainstream, progress from the extra-ordinary into the ordinary. At The Climate Group, we believe that this shift can be achieved by building a network of super-connectors, innovators and early-adopters from business, government and civil society. Armed with a positive, compelling vision of the future, acting as champions for today's low-carbon successes, and committed to their own transformational initiatives, these Clean Revolution leaders have the power to change perceptions and create the necessary tipping points in global opinion and action that the world requires. 108 inNOVATION TECHNOLOGY