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Right: Tiles with DESSO EcoBase® backing" The McKinsey report estimates that global business could make resource productivity savings of between US$2.9 trillion and US$3.7 trillion per year by 2030 "materials in this way; and it is something that we have to develop with our suppliers. But it means we can start to build closed loop systems along all our supply chains. We have met our Cradle to Cradle® targets every year so far, making most of the initial changes in our carpet tiles division - the largest part of our business. By 2010, we had achieved a Cradle to Cradle® Silver Certification for 90 per cent of our polyamide carpet tile range, with our polyolefin based backing known as EcoBaseT. Due to its innovative composition, the polyolefin based layer of the EcoBaseT backing can be fully recycled within our production process. Getting this certificate meant that the ingredients had been assessed and up to 97 per cent are positively defined.6 We also created a new business to take back old carpets from our customers and competitors (excluding those containing PVC). Much of the yarn is separated and sent back to a supplier to be remade into new yarn and the bitumen backing (most common at the moment) is reused in the road and roofing industry. In the future, we will get our EcoBaseT carpet tiles back and here the polyolefin based layer is fully recyclable.In this new model we have begun to think differently, which has led to innovations based on the desire to improve human health, wellness and well-being. One example is the development of the Desso AirMaster® carpet tile which is specially designed to capture large amounts of fine dust that would otherwise become airborne again inside buildings. This product has proved enormously popular with offices, schools, care centres and so on. They all deal with the problem of fine dust causing or aggravating conditions such as asthma, and the feedback is that our carpets help to combat this problem.In the immediate term, we in Europe face continued economic challenges. However, we agree with Potocnik when he says that Europe can become more competitive but "only if it becomes greener."7 nREFERENCES1 Potocnik, J, Building on the pillars of life, development and poverty eradication, meeting of the infrastructure and environment committee of the Dutch Parliament, The Hague, 13 April, 2012.2 Dobbs, R, Oppenheim, J, Thompson, F, Brinkman, M, & Zornes, M., Resource Revolution: Meeting the world's energy, materials, food, and water needs, McKinsey Global Institute, November 2011. 3 Dobbs, R, Oppenheim, J, Thompson, F, Brinkman, M, & Zornes, M., Resource Revolution: Meeting the world's energy, materials, food, and water needs, McKinsey Global Institute, November 2011.4 Dobbs, R, Oppenheim, J, Thompson, F, Brinkman, M, & Zornes, M., Resource Revolution: Meeting the world's energy, materials, food, and water needs, McKinsey Global Institute, November 2011.5 Ellen MacArthur Foundation, Towards the Circular Economy - Economic and business rationale for an accelerated transition, 2012. Available at: www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/about/circular-economy.6 Positively defined = all ingredients have been assessed as either Green (optimal) or Yellow (tolerable) according to the Cradle to Cradle® assessment criteria.7 Potocnik, J, Building on the pillars of life, development and poverty eradication, meeting of the infrastructure and environment committee of the Dutch Parliament, The Hague, 13 April, 2012.ABOUT THE AUTHORStef Kranendijk became a co-owner and CEO of Desso in 2007 after it had been bought out from the Armstrong Group. He has also been President (EMEA) of Stanley Works, Vice President of P&G for Central & Eastern Europe, Vice President & General Manager of P&G Germany and General Manager of P&G Netherlands. Contact Details:Morice MendozaMENDOZAMEDIAmobile: +44 (0) 7944 128298e-mail : morice@mendozamedia.co.ukFor more information, please visit: www.desso.com or www.twitter.com/dessogroup???green supply chain 1 27

Continuing MobilityW hich technology is most responsible for shaping our world over the last 100 years? The strongest arguments might be for cheap and plentiful energy, telecommunications, modernhealthcare or perhaps transport systems that have enabled unprecedented personal mobility.Vehicle manufacturers, of course, are advocates for personal mobility. After all, 80 per cent of land journeys are made by car today - a fact that has had a major impact on where and how we live and work. Given the mobility revolution that the automobile has powered, it is worth considering that the car is still evolving. It has become a point at which the key technologies of the last 100 years are converging.This evolution is being motivated by urgent necessity and driven by an enormous investment. In Europe alone, the automobile industry is the largest private investor in research, with the 18 ACEA members committing over ?26 billion annually to R&D. This is helping the industry to adapt to a changing world, creating new forms of mobility that communicate more and are better connected, that use energy more efficiently, that are cleaner to manufacture, to use and dispose of, and are safer in every respect. The connected and networked driving experience is already a part of our lives: vehicles use satellites for navigation, receive digital radio for in-car entertainment and link with mobile phones for safer hands-free use. Increasingly, these systems are linked together through the embedded IT system (along with access to information on the vehicle and on driving conditions) to produce a seamlessly integrated experience. This is radically changing the vehicles we drive and ride in. Vehicles are being designed with integrated safety and communications technologies right from the start."those looking for a more economical, greener driving experience are buying cars that automatically moderate fuel consumption and also use stop-start technology to reduce emissions when the vehicle is at rest."Ivan Hodac, Secretary-General, The European Automobile Manufacturers' Association (ACEA)It is also changing how people interact with vehicles, offering an experience that more closely resembles how we use consumer electronics. This shift is being accelerated by the availability of ubiquitous access to high-speed wireless internet, and is resulting in cars that communicate with the driver, the road, the traffic and the wider world. Travelling no longer means being disconnected from our stationary surroundings.Such innovations will hugely increase safety, comfort and convenience. However, it raises important questions about the relationship between human drivers and computer intelligence, and whether this will lead to a more passive travel experience and to a world in which integrated virtual control is the norm, rather than a quirky novelty. In any case, it is essential that the driver stays in control of the vehicle, but computer intelligence has a particular role to play in alerting and augmenting the driver's own abilities. Automotive manufacturers are already 128 transport and mobility