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WINTER 2010I sea& iI21 captain'sview be a good communicator - you're not just a captain, you're a human being, and it's important that your crew appreciate that. GOCHE ON. UNUSUAL CHARTERS One of my most curious experiences was for a couple in Tahiti many years ago. They had chartered a yacht of which I was captain, and at 10am every day they would hand me a large amount of cash and ask me to disappear with the crew until 6pm. So we left them anchored in privacy on a sandbank in Bora Bora and went off to enjoy ourselves ashore - we were exhausted by the end of the week. GOCHE ON. ALLURES It is a real pleasure to work on Allures. She has a unique and innovative design and whips along at around 20 knots under sail, which is fun. If I could magically alter her, all I'd do is change her length to 39m ( 130') to give her expedition and world- cruising capacity. n GOCHE ON. HIS BACKGROUND I was born a few feet above sea level in Tahiti, and my childhood was spent surrounded by the Pacific Ocean; I think it seeped into my blood. My parents built and owned a yacht called Danae III. She was the first charter sailing yacht in Tahiti, so I completed my initial cruise as a crew member around the age of one. I decided early on to make yachting my life. GOCHE ON. THE SUPERYACHT INDUSTRY I have been involved with yachts for nearly 40 years. In the early days, people were drawn to work at sea because of their love of the ocean and the remarkable freedom and lifestyle it afforded. Today, that life can be very far from reality. Money comes first - how much you can make and how fast. Seamanship is becoming a rare quality. On the plus side, the profession is gaining respect, and being a captain or crew member is finally getting the professional recognition it deserves. One of the significant changes I'd like to see is a dedicated training school for crew. It's a real job with very special guests and circumstances, and a professional college would be fantastic preparation for a career at sea. GOCHE ON. TRAVEL My favourite cruising destinations are Sicily, Turkey, Croatia, the Galapagos, the East Coast of America and my homeland Tahiti. I haven't yet cruised the Indian Ocean or Norwegian Fjords, so they're on my wish list - as are Vietnam and the South Pole. GOCHE ON. BEING A CAPTAIN Boats are easy, they don't try to think for you; it's the crew that can make life a challenge. I'd advise anyone coming up through the ranks to be open- minded and always ready to revise their opinion and position. It's also important to SPECIFICATIONS LENGTH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30.3m ( 99' 4) BEAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13m ( 42' 6) DRAFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.2m ( 7' 2) BUILDER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Composite Works, France YEAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2006 GUESTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 CREW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4/ 5 CRUISING AREA . . . . . Caribbean ( winter); West Mediterranean ( summer) PRICES FROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .? 55,000/ week

22Isea& iIWINTER 2010 a fellow chef mentioned the yachting industry that I realised there was another world out there for talented chefs." After a stint as sous chef aboard the classic steam yacht Delphine, Watson joined Galaxy in 2006, again as sous chef. A few months into the season he was made head chef, and he has been garnished with awards and accolades ever since. Watson embraces the concept of meal planning, often catching up with guests on a daily basis to refine choices for each meal, and adjusting menus according to changes in weather, activities or location. Watson loves the freedom that a yacht provides and excels in the challenges it presents. sampling life aboard " A typical day aboard Galaxy begins with a buffet breakfast of fruits, meats, cheeses, homemade muffins and breads, with the option of a bespoke hot breakfast," Watson explains. " Lunches are usually a relaxed affair, with platters of meat and fish dishes, salads and freshly baked breads, allowing each guest to chose what, and how much, they want." A favourite lunch dessert for Watson is something light, such as Champagne and berries. Dinners are typically three course affairs, and the night finishes with home- made chocolates laid on the guests' pillows. Watson's speciality dishes include his homemade sugar- free, low- fat muffins - a particular favourite among guests. " An added benefit of working on a yacht," Watson concludes, " is that fresh fish is always on the menu. Depending on the catch of the day, I will prepare sushi and sashimi, seafood tasting platters, and fresh, homemade seafood pastas". n Galaxy is available to charter with CNI. Sleeping 12 guests in six cabins, she has a crew of 15, including Watson and his sous chef. Taste notes with. Hamish Watson Miriam Caincatches up with the head chef of the 56m ( 183') Galaxy to talk about his mouthwatering breakfasts, lunches, dinners and treats T he one place you can be assured of inspired cuisine created with the individual in mind is aboard a superyacht, which is where you will find Hamish Watson, head chef on board Galaxy. A professional chef for almost a decade, Watson spent several years perfecting his skills before moving his creative talents off shore. Watson initially went to university in Christchurch, New Zealand, where he studied for an advanced cooking degree, at the same time apprenticing at a premier hotel. After graduating, he spent two years at The George Hotel in Christchurch, where he was responsible for fine dining. He then transferred to the UK, working his way around London and perfecting various culinary specialities - from pastry to Japanese cuisine. " This was the perfect way for me to refine my cooking techniques," says Watson. " But it was only when charter cuisine