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SoundScapeIssue 02 40

SoundScapeIssue 02 41Sounding Brighton those in charge of the design, management and use of cities must take more responsibility for the sonic implications of their actions. We need to take as much care of our soundscapes as of townscapes and landscapes. NAS managing director, Lisa Lavia, explores one city's responseSound affects everything we do. It is fundamental to the health and wellbeing of all life and is a crucial building block for civilisation. It could be called the first element. Before the onslaught of visual media the importance of sound, hearing and listening was overtly understood to be critical to life. But in modern life, we are continually bombarded by noises, and listening has, for many of us, become a 'Cinderella' sense. However, we can develop new ways of listening - and take more control of our listening. To help respond to this need and encourage better public understanding of the associated issues, the Noise Abatement Society (NAS) developed Sounding Brighton supported by the European funded COST (European