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52INNOVATION UK 1993 WIND- UP RADIO Another in the long line of " great British inventors", Trevor Baylis's personal focus is on using technology in innovative ways to address social problems - such as the wind up radio, his " signature" product which is intended to allow people living in remote areas without access to electricity to stay in touch with the world. Baylis's work as a stunt man made him feel kinship with disabled people through friends whose injuries had ended their performing careers. In 1985, this involvement led him to invent and develop a range of products for the disabled called Orange Aids. In 1989, he saw a TV programme about the spread of AIDS in Africa and how a way to halt the spread of the disease would be by education and information using radio broadcasts. Inspired by the programme, Trevor assembled the first prototype of his most well- known invention, the wind- up radio. The original prototype included a small transistor radio, an electric motor from a toy car, and the clockwork mechanism from a music box. He patented the idea and then tried to get it into production, but was met with rejection from everyone he approached. The turning point came when his prototype was featured on the BBC TV programme Tomorrow's World. With money from investors, he formed a company, Freeplay, and in 1996 the Freeplay radio was awarded the BBC Design Award for Best Product and Best Design. In the same year Baylis met Queen Elizabeth II and Nelson Mandela at a state banquet, and also travelled to Africa with the Dutch Television Service to produce a documentary about his life. He was awarded the 1996 World Vision Award for Development Initiative that year. 1997 saw the production in South Africa of the new gen-eration Freeplay radio, a smaller lighter model designed for the Western consumer market with a running time of up to an hour on 20 seconds of winding. This radio has since been updated to include a solar panel so that it runs in sunshine without winding. In October 1997, Baylis was awarded the Order of the British Empire by the Prin-cess Royal at Buckingham Palace. He was also awarded an hon-orary doctorate by Leeds Metro-politan University in June 2005. He now runs Trevor Bay-lis Brands plc, a com-pany dedicated to help-ing inventors to develop and protect their ideas and to find a route to market. 2001 - iPod Jonathan Ive, CBE, is a British designer and the Senior Vice President of Industrial Design at Apple Inc. He is internationally renowned as the principal designer of the iMac, aluminum and titanium PowerBook G4, MacBook, unibody MacBook Pro, iPod and iPhone. After attending school in the south of England, Jonathan moved North to study art and design at Newcastle Poly-technic in 1985. He graduated with first- class honours having created a pebble- shaped concept for a product to replace cash and credit cards as his final- year project. In 1990 Jonathan moved to London and co- founded his own design studio, Tangerine, with Martin Darbyshire. Apple was a client of Tangerine and in 1992 Jonathan moved to Cupertino, California to join Apple's design team full- time. In 1998, he revolutionised computer design by creating the iMac, an Apple computer whose successive incarna-tions inside coloured and translucent " televisions" seized the imagination of designers and consumers. Later, he started to explore how Apple can engineer a computer hard drive that will play thousands of songs in a box that fits inside a back pocket or purse. Collaborat-ing with manufacturing, software, hardware and elec-tronic teams, he did just that, creating the iconic, best-selling iPod. In 2005, he designed Apple's iPod nano, and in 2007, the iPhone. 3 Great British Inventions Great British Inventions Great British inventions

Encouraging and supporting innovation for social, economic and environmental benefi t through the use of geography Join the GeoVation Challenge at: https:// challenge. geovation. org. uk Supported by ordnance survey