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TEACHING VALUES AN OLYMPIC EDUCATION TOOLKIT READING John Akhwari Fulfils His Commitment Mexico City was the site of one of the great moments of marathon history. It was long after the last runners had finished the marathon race. Everyone was leaving the stadium. It was practically empty. Suddenly a runner appeared at the place where the marathon route entered the stadium. John Stephen Akhwari of Tanzania was hobbling painfully down the track. His legs were bandaged following an accident on the marathon route. Before a stunned audience he made his painful way around the track. At first there was silence. Then the small crowd began cheering on this remarkable athlete. They cheered him as if he were the winner of the race. When a reporter asked him why he continued in spite of his injuries he simply said." I don't think you understand. My country did not send me to Mexico to start the race. They sent me to finish the race." In 2000, at the closing ceremony of the Sydney Games, Akhwari was given an award by former IOCPresident Juan Antonio Samaranch as a living symbol of the Olympic ideal. FOR DISCUSSION Why do you think Akhwari did not give up even though he was injured? What are some reasons why people stop doing things that they want to do when there are difficulties or obstacles? Tell a story about a time you started to do something and you stopped doing it because you had a difficulty or a problem. What would you do differently if you could recreate or relive this situation? Tell a story about a time when you accomplished something even though there were difficulties or problems. What did you learn about yourself at this time? RightSydney 2000: John Stephen Akhwari ( TAN) at the closing ceremony. I'LLFINISH THERACE! SECTION 4 THE FIVE EDUCATIONAL VALUES OF OLYMPISM TEACHING VALUES111 SOMETIMES BEING THE BEST THAT YOU CAN BE DOES NOT NECESSARILY MEAN THAT YOU ARE THE FASTEST, THE HIGHEST OR THE STRONGEST. IT MEANS THAT YOU HAVE MADE A COMMITMENT AND YOU FULFIL YOUR COMMITMENT – REGARDLESS.

112TEACHING VALUES SECTION 4 THE FIVE EDUCATIONAL VALUES OF OLYMPISM A ll of these quotations highlight the need not only to make physical education and sport a priority in educational systems, but to return physical activity to normal classrooms and to the lives of children and young people of every age. Pierre de Coubertin understood this need. His dream that a revival of the Olympic Games with international competitions would stimulate interest in sport and physical activity for young people remains as relevant today as it was 100 years ago. " BODILY- KINAESTHETIC INTELLIGENCE IS THE FOUNDATION OF HUMAN KNOWING SINCE IT IS THROUGH OUR SENSORY- MOTOR EXPERIENCES THAT WE EXPERIENCE LIFE." ( CAMPBELL, L., CAMPBELL, B. AND DICKENSON, D. ( 1996). TEACHING AND LEARNING THROUGH MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES, SECOND EDITION. BOSTON: ALLYN AND BACON, P. 67.) " RESTRICTING EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMES TO A PREPONDERANCE OF LINGUISTIC AND MATHEMATICAL INTELLIGENCES MINIMISES THE IMPORTANCE OF OTHER FORMS OF KNOWING." ( CAMPBELL, L., CAMPBELL, B. AND DICKENSON, D. ( 1996). TEACHING AND LEARNING THROUGH MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES, SECOND EDITION. BOSTON: ALLYN AND BACON, P. XV.) " MODERN EDUCA-TION… HAS ALLOWED ITSELF TO BE CARRIED AWAY BY EXTREME COMPARTMENTALISA-TION… EACH STRENGTH WORKS IN ISOLATION, WITHOUT ANY LINK OR CONTACT WITH ITS NEIGHBOUR. IF THE TOPIC IS MUSCLES, THEY ONLY WANT TO SEE ANIMAL FUNCTION. THE BRAIN IS FURNISHED AS THOUGH IT WERE MADE UP OF TINY, AIR- TIGHT COMPARTMENTS." ( PIERRE DE COUBERTIN, IN MÜELLER, N. ( ED.). ( 2000). PIERRE DE COUBERTIN: OLYMPISM, SELECTED WRITINGS. LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND: INTERNATIONAL OLYMPIC COMMITTEE, P. 547.) RightSydney 2000: Andrea Raducan ( ROM) completes her routine on the beam during the Women's Gymnastics All- Around Final at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. Raducan won the all-round title. E: BALANCEBETWEEN BODY, WILL ANDMIND LEARNING TAKES PLACE IN THE WHOLE BODY, NOT JUST IN THE MIND. PHYSICAL LITERACY AND LEARNING THROUGH MOVEMENT CONTRIBUTES TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF BOTH MORAL AND INTELLECTUAL LEARNING.