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IOC Marketing Report – Beijing 2008133 Brand ProtectionChapter Eight Broadcast Monitoring As the most widely watched televised sporting event in the world, it is also essential that Olympic broadcasts are checked for possible violations. To manage this, an Infringement Monitoring Programme is put in place for each edition of the Olympic Games. As well as protecting the exclusive rights of the IOC's broadcasting partners, the Beijing 2008 Infringement Monitoring Programme checked for unauthorised use of Olympic intellectual property and Olympic marks. The programme also monitored broadcasts to ensure the unique, " clean" nature of the Olympic Games broadcast, checking for ambush marketing advertisements, unauthorised commercial overlays and overt in- studio commercial signage. Internet Monitoring As the Internet becomes an increasingly important means of communicating and consuming broadcast footage, so too does the challenge of online piracy for major sports and entertainment events. By working with media partners to offer an abundance of freely available, high quality content across media platforms around the world, including over the Internet, the IOC limited the risk of online piracy of the Games. In addition, to safeguard the exclusive rights of its broadcast partners, the IOC led a sophisticated, proactive anti- piracy campaign throughout the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games. The IOC's Beijing 2008 Internet Monitoring Programme used advanced technology based on video fingerprinting technology, combined with sophisticated web crawling techniques, to prevent, track and take action against the upload of unauthorised Olympic content. In addition, the IOC worked in cooperation with a number of major video- sharing web sites, including through its collaboration with YouTube, to prevent thousands of additional video infringements. In the host country, the IOC worked with a task force consisting of BOCOG, Chinese government authorities, and CCTV. com and its sub- licensees, which enabled the successful prevention and rapid removal of online broadcast infringements. The total effect of the IOC's anti- piracy campaign succeeded in containing online infringement of Olympic video to minimal levels. Traffic to pirated footage was vastly outweighed by traffic to legitimate footage on official IOC partner platforms.