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94Isea& iIAUTUMN 2009 T he overnight market collapse at the end of September 2008 triggered a change, and most probably an irreversible one, in the large yacht industry. Offers were withdrawn, build contracts cancelled and existing contracts left as Owners chose to invest their funds either in other opportunities, or to use themto protect their current business interests. Sellers were left facing the prospect of extended ownership, in the anticipation of an absence of Buyers prepared to pay the premiums often achieved in the preceding few years. But the immense joys and privileges derived from being afloat are still the same. Opportunities for the cash Buyer and the most demanding of Charterer remain available, and for this reason the market in 2009 is in many ways stronger, and certainly more interesting, than in previous seasons. All aspects of the yacht industry need to continue to adapt and change. There will be no overnight return to yesterday, no quick fix back to the market we all knew. Instead companies need to offer better service, a wide range of specialised skills, and focus on their core business ( that of a service industry) in order to succeed and grow. In so doing they will be able to influence the market in a positive way, offering sound experienced advice. Pedigree and experience will now prevail. It is with every hope and expectation that the second half of 2009 will see the experienced brokers offer the best opportunities to their clients with impartiality and expertise. This is what has concluded the recent spate of large yacht sales, and what is required to continue these deals throughout the remainder of the year. It takes a shake up for the cream to rise to the top and this will be apparent as we enter boat show season and the deals available at this time. ¦ For further information and to have a complete overview of 2008 superyachting business, log onto www. camperandnicholsons. com/ superyachting- index- 2009 The latest Camper & Nicholsons International ( super) Yachting Index 2009, released in July, looks at the year 2008, with data on both sales and charter for the year. Toby Walker, CNI's Director of Sales, summarises his views on the current situation of the superyacht market for 2009, in anticipation of the next edition to be released mid- 2010 Superyacht business CNI listings

salesbrokerage The listings market has been a flurry of activity with several new yachts joining the CNI sales books since the last issue of sea& i. Below are just a selection of the finest on offer SHERAKHAN 69.65m/ 228' 6, Vuyk en Zonen, 1965/ 2008 LADY ANN MAGEE II 65m/ 213' 3, Codecasa, 2010 XANADU 60m/ 196' 1, Benetti, 2008 PESTIFER 49.75m/ 163' 2, CRN, 1998 HANA 43m/ 139' 9, CRN, 2008 BAGLIETTO 42M 42m/ 137' 9, Baglietto, 2009 CLOUD X 37.5m/ 123', Nichols, 2002 QUEST 36.6m/ 120', Benetti, 2009 NECKLACE II 36.3m/ 119' 1 Heesen 2004 PHILOSOPHY 41.5m/ 136' 3, Brooke Yachts, 1991/ 2009 CATWALK 40.6m/ 133' 2, Kaiserwerft, 2006 SAPPHIRE 38.5m/ 126' 3, Custom, 1996/ 2009 AUTUMN 2009I sea& iI95 -> Recent listings