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60 2009 GREATER PHOENIX ULTIMATE GUIDE TO LIVING HERE getting around Y ou can call it confusing, but you sure can't call it boring! Rather than sticking with the ho- hum numeri-cal format of naming roads, the Arizona State Transportation Board and the Arizona State Board on Geographic and Historic Names started adding a bit of educational content to the process back in the 1980s. So, locals ( and those who spend a few days racking up the miles around the city) know exactly what they're talking about when they refer to the Superstition Freeway, named for the mountains framing the East Valley; the Hohokam Expressway, named for the original indigenous inhabitants of the Valley in Phoenix; and the Agua Fria Freeway, named for the river and canyon cutting through the West Valley. But what's in a name, after all? Wher-ever the rubber hits the road, the Arizona Department of Transportation continues to make travel more convenient. July 2008 marked the completion of the larg-est project in Valley freeway construction history with the five- mile stretch of Red Mountain Freeway/ Loop 202 in Mesa. Thanks to the passage of the Proposition 400 sales tax extension in 2004, and the designation of more than $ 300 million in state funds, the prioritization of the transportation system continues apace. Smooth Moves Constant improvement means convenient travel — even to the far reaches of the Valley… by Jake Poinier photo: The arizona republic Continued on page 62 getting around

2009 GREATER PHOENIX ULTIMATE GUIDE TO LIVING HERE 61 Driver's License If you are new to the state, you will be required to show your out- of- state driver license when you apply for an Arizona license. Arizona is a member of the National Driver Register, a nationwide computer system providing information about problem drivers. When you apply for an Arizona driver license, the information from your application is checked against this system. If you have outstanding or unresolved actions in any other state, an Arizona license will not be issued. When you apply for a license you need to provide at least two types of documents showing your identification and proof of age — one of these documents must have a clear photo of you. If you do not have a document with your photo, you can provide three documents. These documents must be original copies certified by the issuing agency and must be in English. An extensive list of qualifying documents can be found on the Arizona Department of Transportation — Motor Vehicle Division Web site. Title and Registration If your vehicle was registered in another state and you wish to operate it in Arizona, you must register it here as soon as you become an Arizona resident. Most vehicles may be registered for either one or two years at a time. An Arizona resident who does not have complete documentation for issuance of a title or registration may apply for a 90- day registration, which allows you to operate the vehicle while obtaining additional documentation. When obtaining an Arizona title, registration and license plate, you will need the following items: YOUR CAR: The make, vehicle identification number, body style and other general vehicle information must be verified at an MVD office. AN EMISSIONS TEST: Your vehicle may need to pass an emissions test prior to registration. For more information on emissions testing, contact the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality at 800- 284- 7748. PROOF OF INSURANCE: Arizona requires that every motor vehicle operated on its roadways be covered by liability insurance through a company that is authorized to do business in Arizona. YOUR OUT- OF- STATE LICENSE PLATES: You must surrender your out- of- state license plates when you obtain your Arizona plates. More information can be found on the Arizona Department of Transportation– Motor Vehicle Division's Web site at www. azdot. gov/ mvd or by calling 602- 255- 0072. Rules of the road Information for new Arizona drivers Arizona Department of Transportation • 602- 712- 7355 • ww. dot. state. az. us Arizona Motor Vehicle Division • 602- 255- 0072 • 602- 712- 3222, TIDD hearing/ speech impaired • www. dot. state. az. us/ mvd • www. servicearizona. com Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport • 602- 273- 3300 • www. phxskyharbor. com Valley Metro Bus • 602- 253- 5000 • www. valleymetro. org/ bus Valley Metro Rail • 602- 254- 7245 • www. metrolightrail. org TRANSPORTATION RESOURCE GUIDE photo: The arizona republic